Facebook Fundraising: Where the sweet spot lies… Insights from AFP International 2013

It's no secret that charities and nonprofits have not been hugely successful raising donations from Facebook. Most organizations have found that...

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If you're one of the dozens of Canadians concerned that radical charities are advocating for things like clean air and polar bears far too much,...

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It's my 10th year attending the Toronto International Film Festival with the same group of girlfriends. #TIFF12 is a big anniversary for...

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Wendy’s Canada is telling a “Baconator and Son of Baconator” narrative on Facebook that seems to be taking a dark, unsettling turn. The...

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You've probably read plenty of opinions in an online newspaper comments section about the rich folks working at charities earning all those...

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Sometimes, you have to say "sorry"! Don't you just love a good "brand fail" pile-on? It's very satisfying to take screen-captures and gleefully...

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This is your introduction to the unlikely genre of “charitable sector murder mystery novels”. Who knew so many people faced the risk of being...

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Have you taken the Cute Fight poll yet? Baby lemur vs. penguin chick … It’s a tough one. (more…)

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The very best party in Toronto this spring benefits the very best cause: Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario’s (POGO) annual After Party soiree is...

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The breast cancer cause may be having its annus horribilis moment, with the recent release of Pink Ribbons Inc. and the much-discussed controversy...

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It’s no secret that charities and nonprofits have not been hugely successful raising donations from Facebook. Most organizations have found that donation appeals from charities to donors on Facebook typically have much lower response rates than traditional channels.

Don’t despair! There is one fundraising scenario where Facebook is extremely effective: Peer-driven or “crowdsourced” campaigns. Facebook is a visibly successful channel for giving when an organization’s supporters ask their friends and social networks to give to a good cause.

This is the “sweet spot” for Facebook and online giving.

Facebook fundraisers raise more

In the Fundraising with Facebook research paper, we looked at millions of dollars in donations, thousands of individuals fundraising, and hundreds of charity campaigns to answer the questions:

“Does Facebook make it easier for a charity’s supporters to raise money for good causes?”, “How well does Facebook convert a donor to action?”, “What’s the average size of an online donation referred by Facebook?” and more. The answers might surprise you!

Some insights about Facebook & fundraising:

    1. Over 14% of traffic to fundraising and donation pages already comes from Facebook.
    2. 15-18% of donations in a peer-driven campaign are referred directly from Facebook.
    3. When people are fundraising online for good causes, those that use Facebook social login (connect their fundraising accounts to Facebook) raise 40% more money than those that do not.
    4. Individuals fundraising while connected to Facebook earn 30% more individual donations than those who do not.
    5. Women are more likely to try fundraising using Facebook than men!
    6. Facebook has a much, much higher conversion rate for donations than Twitter.

      Review more in my AFP International 2013 presentation below:

      When you ask social network users which platform is their favourite, the overwhelming answer is Facebook, but, how much do you know about the impact of Facebook on online donations?

      This session examines how Facebook affects peer-driven or “crowdsourced” online fundraising campaigns, using data from “Fundraising with Facebook”, the Artez Interactive research paper. Presented April 8, 2013 at the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) International Conference.


If you’re one of the dozens of Canadians concerned that radical charities are advocating for things like clean air and polar bears far too much, you’ll be pleased with this news … METRO Vancouver reports that after allocating $8 million dollars to crackdown on registered charities spending more than the permitted 10% on advocacy, the federal government audited approximately 900 orgs and found ONE group in violation of the rules!

Physicians for Global Survival were using 26% of their resources for political activities related to nuclear disarmament. We can all rest safer knowing this dangerous cell has been punished for excessive time spent writing letters to the government about nukes.

Polar Bears

These polar bears are less than 10% politically active

You may recall the federal crackdown prompted David Suzuki to step down from the David Suzuki Foundation after “bullying” threats of audits. Three previous internal reviews found less than 1% of its resources were used for political activities. Said Suzuki of the audits: “It’s very demoralizing, because so much of that resource then is dedicated to that process, and the last time we were audited I think it cost over $100,000 of our money to do that, so it’s a very expensive, punitive thing that can be done.”

David Suzuki, ex of David Suzuki Foundation

Here’s what Suzuki wrote in his resignation letter:

I have reached a point in my life where I would like to consider myself an elder. I want to speak freely without fear that my words will be deemed too political, and harm the organization of which I am so proud. I am keenly aware that some governments, industries and special interest groups are working hard to silence us. They use threats to the Foundation’s charitable status in attempts to mute its powerful voice on issues that matter deeply to you and many other Canadians.

This bullying demonstrates how important it is to speak out.

On the bright side for you radicals out there, this heightened scrutiny on advocacy actions by registered charities has led some to notice that they weren’t near the 10% threshold and can become more active.

Ben West, tar sands campaign director for ForestEthics Advocacy, explained to METRO:

“I think a lot of groups there was this desire to not get bullied and instead to stand up and fight… but it wasn’t a defensive move, it was an offensive move.”

If your org is under that 10% threshold, what do you want to spend those spare resources on? May I suggest … Some awesome sandwich boards?


It’s my 10th year attending the Toronto International Film Festival with the same group of girlfriends. #TIFF12 is a big anniversary for us.

TIFF12

Here’s a glimpse at the memories you earn after seeing hundreds of movies when you’re a member of the proletariat herd attending the festival. If you’ve “done TIFF”, add yours in the comments!


Best Ever, Mostest Awesome TIFF Memories!

 
TIFF12

Acknowledging the only celebrities you are probably gonna “spot” are Canadian actors from Stargate: Atlantis.

Your inability to find anybody who admits they voted for the People’s Choice winner. Conspiracy!?

Colin Geddes fondly starting Midnight Madness introductions with: “I was out for dinner with…”

The frumid feeling at Scotiabank theatre: Freezing AND humid. Why is it so frumid?

Enduring mentions of that one popular Hollywood film everyone will ask you if you’re seeing. “No, it comes out in October. Yes, I’ll see it then. Sure, it would be cool if we saw George Clooney.”

The sophisticate in a line-up who wants to explain Fanny Ardant to you. His hipster son who wants to explain Takashi Miike to you.

Off sale? Good news chums, there’s always Wavelengths!

 

TIFF12

Women your Mom’s age making graphic sexual comments about Ryan Gosling, ruining all your own secret fantasies about Ryan Gosling.

Awkwardly weeping whilst eating a bagel at a 9am screening of a sad movie.

“Uhhhhhhhhhhh … Ask a person with a headset on.”

When that dude on the street is either Seth Rogan or the guy from the Rogers ad … Know that it’s definitely the guy from the Rogers ad.

Paying $18 for a salad you don’t even remember eating. That money is gone, friend. It’s gone.

 
TIFF12

Catching a glimpse of the back of Cameron Bailey’s head as he’s whisked away to a much better place than wherever the hell you are.

Enjoying an audience member’s poorly-timed or inappropriately loud “Arrrr”.

Listening to the row behind you explain how they are sooo overrrr “Arrrrrs”.

Avoiding films that have a TIFF description starting with: “An introspective look at—”

Avoiding films that have a TIFF description starting with: “An intimate look at–”

Doing the mental math: “Do I have time to pee in the underground bathroom cavern at Ryerson?”

British actresses consistently described by critics as “luminous” …Phosphorescent, if you will.

 
TIFF12

The inevitable, inescapable (almost tender?) yearly failure of Tiff.net to simply take your money, and in return, give you tickets.

Run, run, running up the stairs to your favourite spot in the Winter Garden and plopping your ass down all self-satisfied-like because that’s your spot.

Feeling the hot, red, typhoon of fury over a film’s inaccurate reviews on Twitter – How can they BE so wrong?

 

Taking this shitty photo of Simon Pegg.

Snagging the last curb seat in a rush line and making your sucker friends stand. Because they are suckers.

Swearing that this year, this is the year you become a TIFF member, and get all that sweet priority treatment, and then totally not doing it.

Fanboys who are pretty sure you girls “just didn’t understand” the ground-breaking horror film.

Developing a complex personal system for filling out your Pre-Order Booklet as per everyone’s schedule and still fucking it up.

The dead, cold eyes of Freebie Slaves handing out product samples to people in line. “Pretzel sticks!” … “BlackBerry batteries!”

 
TIFF12

The awareness that “It was well-received at Venice” is a warning, not an endorsement.

“I had no time for parties, I was seeing movies” totally fails to comfort you when you don’t get party invites. :-(

Blindly buying tickets for anything from South Korea because that country never lets you down.

The exclusive delight of being a veteran and lording it over newbies forced to listen to your reminiscences. (“Well, in 2004, TIFF was held uphill BOTH WAYS…”)

The warm pleasure of bitching about a new TIFF ad because “It wasn’t as good as Dance Fight.”

That one friend who tells you: “I don’t want to see anything with subtitles.”

Never being appropriately dressed for the changing weather. Might as well go fucking naked am I right?

“WHY ARE YOU PEOPLE WALKING SO SLOW ON KING STREET????”

Final credits that actually do say FIN.




Wendy’s Canada is telling a “Baconator and Son of Baconator” narrative on Facebook that seems to be taking a dark, unsettling turn.

The drama started innocently on July 25th with a father-son fishing trip.

Baconator & Son of Baconator

Soon followed by a side-car joy ride the next week. Well whatever floats your boat, burgers…

Baconator & Son of Baconator

Later, we discovered Baconator is taking an uncomfortable interest in Son of Baconator’s sex life.

Baconator & Son of Baconator

That’s creepy, but it got creepier when Baconator had his kid inked in a display of “mutual affection”.

Baconator & Son of Baconator

Do we need to step in and rescue this burger?

Baconator himself is short on words but clearly has a mind in the gutter.

Baconator Facebook

Whoever is managing this brand on Facebook for Canada is obviously a hell of a lot more fun than the folks running Wendy’s USA.


You’ve probably read plenty of opinions in an online newspaper comments section about the rich folks working at charities earning all those outrageous, “wasteful” salaries. 

Peep at the graph below …

Marvel at the bags of cash up for grabs …

 

My advice to job-seekers is to snag one of these plentiful sweet deals immediately and then invite me to party on your yacht, son!

Charity salaries are amazing!!!

Rich dudes managing a local cat shelter

If public perception believes charitable-sector employees and leaders are morally obliged to earn less than they do now for the complex work they do, I can’t imagine why the community has so many conversations about the turn-over rate. It’s a mystery.


Sometimes, you have to say “sorry”!

Social Media Brand Management Apology MatrixDon’t you just love a good “brand fail” pile-on? It’s very satisfying to take screen-captures and gleefully explain how some other social media manager got it all so very, very wrong.

But are we thinking enough about the poor corporations suffering whichever latest fail is sure to be name-dropped at conferences for the next two years?

Has anyone taken a moment to consider the needs of the 1%?

We are so cruel to brands that are only trying to “be human” and “engage” so that we buy their wonderful and/or delicious things!

I want to help companies out and save them the $$$ necessary to hire a PR disaster specialist. When something goes horribly wrong on social media and you need to apologize, here’s how you do it…

Use the easy Apology Matrix below and never worry about the “right” brand response ever again!

Earlier today we upset
with an unfortunately
No offense was intended by our
When we were notified by
we addressed this
by immediately
In the future we will be
We took measures to ensure
Our thoughts are with
and we ask that you please
Feedback is important to us

 


This is your introduction to the unlikely genre of “charitable sector murder mystery novels”. Who knew so many people faced the risk of being murdered at a fundraising gala?
(more…)


Have you taken the Cute Fight poll yet? Baby lemur vs. penguin chick … It’s a tough one. (more…)


The very best party in Toronto this spring benefits the very best cause: Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario’s (POGO) annual After Party soiree is Saturday April 14th… And I want to see you there!

POGO provides essential support for children, survivors and families of cancer patients. They’re a dedicated team working to ensure that all our kids have equal access to state-of-the-art treatment and services. Last year’s signature event raised over $600,000 to help POGO maintain an integrated pediatric cancer care system in Ontario. This year’s theme is “Inspire”.

What’s unique about POGO’s gala?

 
The glamour! The National Post calls this event “Gala Of The Year” and “Best Dressed”. There is no better excuse to pull out your fancy threads, eat, drink and dance all night at the Liberty Grand. Whether you’re wearing Marc Jacobs or Topshop, here’s your chance to find yourself in the Globe and Mail’s Party Photos of the Week.

POGO gala 2012

"Reverie" : POGO Gala 2011

Want to join us?

 
After Party Tickets are $150, but you can win a free pass!

Post a comment and tell me what you would wear to POGO Gala After Party. Valentino? Joe Fresh? Just a little sumthin’ you whipped together at the “last minute”?

For stylish inspiration, check out Backseatstylers’ fashion coverage of last year’s event!

We’ll be drawing a lucky winner on Thursday April 12th.

UPDATE April 12: We have a lucky winner – Erika! Congrats and see you at the gala!

 

Didn’t win and like to join us on Saturday? Please check out the special $125 ticket promotion at Backseatstylers!

Can’t come to the Gala?

 
You can still buy raffle tickets over the phone to win one of two pieces of pearl and diamond jewelry from Tiffany & Co, valued at almost $20,000. Raffle tickets are 1/$100 or 3/$250. You don’t have to be present at the event to win. Call 416.592.1232 x250 to order.


The breast cancer cause may be having its annus horribilis moment, with the recent release of Pink Ribbons Inc. and the much-discussed controversy surrounding Komen Foundation’s defunding of Planned Parenthood.

Should breast cancer charities address these provocative issues or keep mum and wait for public opinion to move on?

Tumblr reacts to Komen controversy with .gifs

Tumblr reacts to Komen controversy with .gifs

Not every organization considers recent events off-limits for discussion.

Rethink Breast Cancer’s winter newsletter was not afraid to talk about what everyone is already talking about.

Their Executive Director wrote to donors and supporters about the “shake-up” in the sector:

Between the Komen Foundation funding fallout and the release of the documentary Pink Ribbons Inc., provocative and rousing breast cancer headlines have dominated mainstream and social media. A real paradigm shift is brewing as more people are questioning where the money goes and whether feel good messages around early detection or funding a cure are actually making us complacent about ending breast cancer.

It’s fitting and exciting that Rethink Breast Cancer is entering its second decade in the midst of this shake-up in our field. As challengers and change-makers, we’ve always been about “rethinking” this cause and we want to play a leadership role in Canada in changing the conversation away from fights over mammograms to talking seriously about causes of breast cancer and primary prevention.

Yes, we love our parties and are proud to be engaging young people in fundraising through Boobyball, but our small staff is fielding more calls than ever from young women struggling with breast cancer and needing support. Sadly, we continue to lose incredible women to metastatic breast cancer. While we like our pink (modern not frilly of course), we know that pink doesn’t save lives; action and advocacy do.

MJ Coteau, Executive Director

Rethink Breast Cancer Winter Newsletter

Rethink Breast Cancer Winter Newsletter

How does your organization respond to controversial events or issues in your sector?